Tagged: neck tattoos

A Call to Action for More Neck Tattoos

 

A Call to Action for More Neck Tattoos

5/24/11

SLY

 

I’ve often written about my affinity for neck tats and the people who decided they are a good look and fit for their lifestyle.

 

My hypothesis: Neck tattoos are predominantly on three groups of people:

 

1. Professional Athletes. (Basketball players are the worse offenders.)

 

2. Entertainers. (A better decision for Musical acts than Actor.)

 

3. Self-Employed or in a field that does not require customer interaction.

 

My thoughts are rational and I feel they are self evident.The all too proud owners of neck tattoos make the bold statement that: “I never have to worry about my appearance to make a living.”

 

A person in group #3 is most likely an excellent chef who has appeared on “No Reservations” or associated with illegal activities.

 

(I have been on a Tony Bourdain: No Reservations kick.I watched the Pacific Northwest episode where every chef was tat’d from head to toe.)

 

Gangland has also been a DVR favorite of mine the past few years.The number of tattoos on the necks of the criminals on Gangland is astounding. Why would anyone who engages in constant illegal acts ever want to have an easily identifiable trait?

 

Criminals must have been smarter in the past.I cannot think of one famous Mafioso who ever donned a neck tattoo.

 

This brings me to Giovanni Ramirez, the prime suspect in the Bryan Stow beating.I was elated on Sunday morning when the news was reported that he was in custody.I was more elated to learn what tip led to his arrest: Ramirez’s neck tattoo.

 

Ramirez’s Probation Officer (is anyone surprised that Ramirez is a convicted felon?) noticed that Ramirez’s neck tattoo was recently changed and that Ramirez resembled one of the men on the 300 Billboards around the Los Angeles area.

 

Why would someone change one of their most easily identifiable traits?Easy, when someone thinks that an easily indefinable trait may make them easier to indentify.

 

The ironic part is that if Ramirez left his neck tattoo as is, his probation officer probably never makes the call to the Los Angeles Police Department.

 

Witnesses may not even have been able to identify Ramirez’s neck tattoo.The senseless attack occurred at almost 9pm in parking lot that is not well lit.The sketches were not too detailed.

 

Ramirez’s paranoia from a physically identifiable trait he willingly added to his body led him make a decision which led to his arrest.

 

That’s beautiful.

 

Maybe we should take a page out of the “Scarlet Letter” and brand our felons.Instead of a Scarlet A, we should think of a hideous neck tattoo to identify felons of the United States of America.

 

The “Felon Neck Tattoo” would have to be something big, bold, and bright.

 

(Yes, Three Bs alliteration pun intended.)